Author - Kate Stuart

Exploring Wabi Sabi with Louise O’Hara

Kate Stuart is an artist, craftswoman and writer based in the North east of England. She interviewed Louise O’Hara for the Winter Edition of No Serial Number Magazine. The full article can be found at www.noserialnumber.org, and via digital download here. When I first started following Louise O’Hara on Facebook, she still called her page Drawn to Stitch, and I would marvel at the tactile landscapes that took me away to my heart’s home in the Highlands of Scotland. Marrying [...]

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Blanket Without Borders

Kate Stuart is the eco-creator and owner of The Phoenix Green Store, based in Newcastle upon Tyne. Here she talks about her experience with the Blanket Without Borders Project, and her workshops to give opportunity to the North East to share their stories of place and connection with those of the wider community and international family. In January 2017 I answered the call to create a patch for a collaborative blanket that was being made by artist-makers of The Sussex [...]

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A Call For Zero Waste Contributions

Kate Stuart runs The Phoenix Green Store, making household textiles and zero waste alternatives from recycled/reclaimed/re-purposed fabric. She also writes for No Serial Number Magazine and is looking for contributions from people who follow a zero waste lifestyle for her latest article. Read on for more details! I’ve been on a zero-waste journey for a while now. It’s a difficult path, especially when funds are low and you have a family to cater for. Sometimes you just want to give [...]

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Stepping Back in Time – Knockando Woolmill

Early this year, Kate Stuart, our NSN contributor and owner of The¬†Phoenix Green Store, visited Knockando Woolen Mill, an old woolmill in Scotland that contains textile machinery from different periods over the centuries. The Trust who renovated the mill buildings works to educate the general public about the historical significance of the mill while keeping alive the weaving and spinning traditions of the area.   There is something slightly eerie about stepping into a space where the activity therein has remained [...]

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